Quick Trip to Venice, Italy

I took the regular train from the main train station of Bologna located at the northern  inner circular road (old downtown walls).

There are two types of trains from Bologna to Venice; the speed train and the regular train service (12 euros). It leaves the station hourly. Regular trains does not provide tickets and assigned seat numbers thus in rush hours and weekends, finding a seat is a challenge.

I took the risk and jumped onto the cheaper train service. Luckily, I found a seat at the bottom of the last carriage. After 2 hours of train ride, I was in Venice central train station (Stazione di Venezia Santa Lucia).

The bridge connecting Venice to the mainland is riddled with speed cameras so if you decide to drive, be careful not to breach the speed limit. Car parking can be more expensive as well since park slots are limited and mostly private. If you travel by coach, take a monorail to the public bus terminal.

In terms of accommodation, Venice comes with many options but quite expensive compared to other locations in Italy. Even hostels are not cheap. For instance, I had to pay 40 euros a night for a hostel room (room of 6/bunk beds). They also charged me for the covers and bed sheet. (additional 10 euros). So make sure to check the hotel’s inclusions before booking a reservation.

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The largest canal in Venice is the Grand Canal. It has 4 bridges to cross it. The most famous of all the bridges is the Rialto Bridge. Boats run by the local municipality get commuters across the canal.

Boats and gondolas are the main public transportation in Venice. Gondolas are mainly used for tourists and locals sightseeing. A 30-min. gondola ride costs 80 euros. (good for 6 passengers)

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San Marco (St Mark) piazza is the most famous landmark in Venice. A Basilica and a Corer Museum share the same name, San Marko. The square is spacious with plenty of expensive restaurants around it.

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The hostel where I stayed was in Academia region so I cross the Academia Bridge often. The bridge is not as pretty as the Rialto Bridge but during sunsets, it has the best view of the Grand Canal. By crossing the bridge you can reach The Santa Maria (The Salute) Basilica located at the edge of the city.

Nothing much to say about San Marco, best to experience it yourself.
Amazing architectural structures resting along the large square throughout the centuries – beautifully welcome its visitors.

Tips:

  • It’s best to discover the city by foot, though the maze-like streets of the city are quite tricky.
  • During summer months, the city is packed with tourists, try to visit early spring or late autumn or even winter.
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